European Maine Coon Cats

Are Maine Coon Cats Hypoallergenic?

Are Maine Coon Cats Hypoallergenic?
Aleksey Malov Director, MasterCoons Cattery

Being one of the largest felines, Maine Coon holds an exclusive fanbase of cat lovers. Here’s a question for all the enthusiasts! Maine Coon lovers, would you like to know whether the Maine Coon cats are hypoallergenic or not?

The Maine Coon cat is a beautiful breed that is popular for a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, these cats are not hypoallergenic, and their lengthy fur may irritate those who suffer from allergies. However, it's not certain that a person with a cat allergy cannot have a Maine Coon.

Continue reading to learn more about Maine Coon cats, including why they are not hypoallergenic. This article will teach you about hypoallergenic cats, Maine Coon Cat allergens, and how to live with a Maine Coon even if you have a cat allergy.

Why Are Maine Coon Cats Not Hypoallergenic?

Maine Coon cats are not hypoallergenic since their fur is thick and sheds heavily throughout the year. When the Coon's fur sheds, the dander conforms to the hair. This produces significant allergies, particularly during the shedding season.

Additionally, Maine Coon saliva contains that protein allergen. Any time a Maine Coon licks you, your skin may react allergically. Furthermore, whenever the Maine Coon licks a surface, the protein might dry and disseminate into the environment, eliciting respiratory reactions.

Meanwhile, research indicates that Fel d 1 is the predominant feline allergen, with antigens linked to this protein present in 80%–95% of people with feline allergies. The sebaceous glands also secrete the Fel d 2 and Fel d 4 proteins, which cause sensitivities in a tiny subset of patients. All cats create allergies for this reason, regardless of breed, age, or coat length.

When analyzing Maine Coons' or other cats' hypoallergenic characteristics, people typically refer to the following:

  • Fel d 1 concentration in secretions: Siamese, Bengal, and Siberians are among the breeds that allergy sufferers like since they may have low Fel d 1 production. Like other cats, Maine Coons secrete a steady amount of this protein.

  • Shedding intensity: Breeds with lower shedding naturally cause fewer allergic reactions in people prone to allergies, as fur and dander are carriers of Fel d 1. In colder climates, Maine coons often shed twice a year; however, indoors, healthy adults and kittens don't shed as much.

Maine Coons and People with Cat Allergies

Some people have allergies to Maine Coons, but that doesn't mean you can't get one if you have allergies. A lot of people can live happily with their Maine Coon even though they are allergic to cats.

As we already said, Maine Coons aren't the worst breed for people with allergies, and females are much less likely to cause allergies than males. Many people with allergies can feel a lot better after getting a female Maine Coon. Aside from that, taking specific measures, extra care of your Maine Coon and your home will make the symptoms ease up even more.

6 Best Ways to Minimize Cat Allergies

Maine Coon Kittens

Brush and Bath Your Maine Coon Regularly

For people who are allergic to cats, bathing your cat regularly will help minimize allergens in its fur. Cat allergies are most commonly caused by proteins in a cat's saliva or dander on a juvenile cat's skin.

Washing a cat with a veterinarian-recommended shampoo can help minimize these allergies. Brushing your cat regularly is the most effective way to reduce allergy issues. Maine Coons have long and thick fur, which makes it difficult to determine when they are mating.

Daily brushing will prevent this and remove any dust that may be present. To prevent cat allergens from spreading throughout your home, clean the brush after each usage and wash your hands afterward.

Wash Your Hands After Petting Maine Coon

Another thing you can do is wash your hands often to get rid of allergens brought onto your skin by touching a cat. Wash your hands well before touching anything else in the house after petting your cat, and do this again after handling the cat.

If we talk about medical experts, they recommend washing your hands with soap and water for 30 seconds after petting or touching a cat to remove cat hair.

Don’t Let Them Lick You

Cat saliva has allergens that can worsen allergic reactions in people who are already sensitive. Avoid getting too close to cat spit by telling your cat not to lick and staying away from places where it often grooms itself.

Taking this easy but effective step can significantly lower your exposure to allergens, which will help with symptoms like itchiness, sneezing, and stuffy nose. You can also help stop allergies from spreading by washing your hands and any other surfaces that come into touch with your cat regularly.

Keep Your Home Neat and Tidy

Allergens may be in your home if you have a main coon. To lessen the effects of your allergy, you should make your home as allergy-free as possible. Try to clean your house really well if you can. Cleaning the floor with a vacuum will pick up germs. You should shampoo, vacuum, and spot-clean the carpet every day.

Also, make sure that you clean any hard surfaces often with a light soap solution and a damp cloth or sponge. Open the windows and curtains for a few hours every day if you can. This will let fresh air flow through the house and dry out any surfaces still wet from cleaning.

Consult Your Doctor

Get help from a medical professional, ideally an allergen or a doctor specializing in allergies. They can look at your symptoms, do allergy tests if needed, and give you personalized advice on how to deal with your cat allergies. To help ease your symptoms, your doctor may provide allergy medications, nasal sprays, or allergy shots.

In addition, they can give you personalized help on how to change your lifestyle and stay away from allergens—seeing your doctor regularly to ensure your treatment plan is working and to make any necessary changes. Working with a medical professional, especially a veterinarian, will help you understand and handle your cat allergies, which will make your life better.

Restrict the Area of Maine Coon

You can get allergens from cats' hair and fur stuck in your sheets and pillows, which can make you or other allergy sufferers in your home sick. If you have a person in your home who has allergies and your home is full of Maine Coon cats, you might want to limit where your furry friends can go around the house.

This way, allergens won't be as common in places like your bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Teaching your cats to stay away from certain areas will keep allergens from building up and make life easier for everyone who lives with a Maine Coon.

The Bottom Line

Maine Coon Kittens

We now know that Maine Coons are not hypoallergenic, which is bad news for people who like them. If you are very sensitive to allergies, you can keep a Maine Coon and follow the tips to keep them from bothering you. All cats make the Fel d1 protein.

You and your Maine Coon can live together without any problems as long as you clean up after your cat and your home often and stay away from allergens. The amounts of allergies do vary from person to person, though. This means that if you try none of the things at home work for you, you can get allergy medicine.

Thank you for reading our articles and joining us in our Maine Coon kitten adventure! As the Director of this Maine Coon kitten cattery, I’d like to introduce myself and share some insights about our cattery.

My passion for Maine Coon cats ignited years ago when I welcomed my first Maine Coon kitten into my home. Their charismatic personalities, stunning appearance, and loving nature captured my heart, leading me to establish this cattery. Here, we prioritize the well-being, health, and happiness of our Maine Coon kittens. We uphold rigorous breeding standards, ensuring they are raised in a nurturing environment and socialized well. Our commitment extends to responsible breeding practices and collaboration with experienced veterinarians to maintain their health.

Our blog serves as a valuable resource for Maine Coon cat enthusiasts, offering tips on care, grooming, and delightful insights into their unique traits. We appreciate your support and encourage you to reach out with any questions or comments. Thank you for being a part of our Maine Coon kitten community; your engagement means the world to us. We look forward to sharing more about these magnificent cats in our upcoming blog posts.

Warm regards,

Aleksey Malov

Director, MasterCoons Cattery

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